Innovator's dilemma

NAU Building 47A Storage Surplus

NAU Building 47A Storage Surplus

The idea that disruptive technologies enable new markets to emerge is not a new idea. What is new in our case, the technology we created was not as nearly as disruptive as the grand idea. "Let's make sustainable technologies that make economic sense." When we step back and look at our first creation at SolarThermiX, our solar heater the STX 7000, it was not a new idea, humans have used the sun for heat a lot longer than we can take credit for. However, something special happened today down at HQ. Like a Father giving their son that last post-training wheel boost, we saw our big idea take flight on the walls of a University building and cast a solar shadow on the Editor's keyboard! Our green tech made news!

Before we get too far over our skis, let's back up. The novel thing we are really inventing was not our first technology to eliminate the natural gas flow into a University building far cheaper than they could have imagined. No, the real disruptive invention that happened was our tagline we started the company with on a blank white board canvas became real art. No more creating sustainability tech based on how far the securitization teams can wind up the price. No more taking something as pure as the sun and running it through a solar sausage factory, making something that resembles a green product, but yields only 20% of the original energy, energy that could be passed through if you were not focused on the wrong side of the abacus. Economic sense. When you go to Northern Arizona University and see the 10,000SqFt+ storage surplus building 47A sitting on a hill, look at the south wall. What you will see is not our STX 7000 solar heater that raises the intake temperature 70 degrees using only 19 watts of energy, no what you are really seeing is economic sense. That is what we really invented today in the sustainability market and we look forward to what new markets will emerge from that invention.

Read how we slap our own back, courtesy of Cronkite News, PBS Arizona by clicking the "source" link below.